Oregon wildfire melts trucks, leaves warlike destruction in wake By Reuters

China's efforts to resolve financial risks slowed by virus



By Adrees Latif and Brad Brooks

PHOENIX, Ore. (Reuters) – Matt Manson stared at the burned-out corpse of his pick-up truck on Friday, which sat on a blackened driveway in front of a smoldering pile of rubble that once was his house.

Like other residents of the small agricultural town of Phoenix, Oregon, he was in shock as he returned to his neighborhood and saw how fast the Alameda Drive wildfire had engulfed his home and upended his life.

“The fire melted the motor right out of my truck – it drained down the driveway,” said Manson, a 43-year-old construction worker. “I lost everything. I lost all my tools. My truck. I can’t work. I lost $30,000 worth of guitars. All gone.”

Manson, who now owns only a backpack with a change of clothes, struggled to find the words to describe how the fire had ravaged the town that sits near the green Siskiyou Mountains, about 210 miles south of Portland. Trees lining his street were now just blackened, skeletal remains.

“It looks like a war just happened here,” he said.

A half million people in Oregon were ordered to evacuate as of Friday as scores of wildfires ate up the parched countryside, smoke darkening skies across the state, along with neighboring California and Washington. At least 24 people have died since the fires began last month. Authorities say they expect to find many more dead when they can inspect hard-hit areas.

In Phoenix the smoke was still thick in the air as many of its 4,600 residents tried to grasp the extent of the damage. Local authorities said the fire destroyed a large swath of the town. State fire officials said at least two people were killed and four injured, and that the fire was 20% contained as of Friday afternoon.

Doris Peterson, 85, said she only had time to grab Toby, her 12-year-old Chihuahua, when she and her husband, Richard, fled after police banged on their door Tuesday about noon and told them they had just minutes to get out.

They spent five hours in bumper-to-bumper traffic before finding a hotel room in Grants Pass, Oregon – 35 miles up Interstate 5.

On Friday she and her husband sat in their car at a baseball field just north of Phoenix, waiting to be escorted into their neighborhood by police. She was bracing for the worst, but still hoped for a miracle.

“I called my landline phone – and the answering machine picked up!” she said. “My next door neighbor’s will not pick up. Maybe our house survived.”

Disclaimer: Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. All CFDs (stocks, indexes, futures) and Forex prices are not provided by exchanges but rather by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the actual market price, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Therefore Fusion Media doesn`t bear any responsibility for any trading losses you might incur as a result of using this data.

Fusion Media or anyone involved with Fusion Media will not accept any liability for loss or damage as a result of reliance on the information including data, quotes, charts and buy/sell signals contained within this website. Please be fully informed regarding the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, it is one of the riskiest investment forms possible.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


About us

InvestLab is a financial services technology company focused on the global trading market. Founded in 2010 in Hong Kong, the company develops trading, market data, and social research products that enable individual investors and small to mid-size brokers to access global markets. We provide brokers and financial institutions cross border capabilities for retail investors into 43 markets globally.


CONTACT US

CALL US ANYTIME