Smart Contracts

Secured and Fast Smart Contracts

Smart contracts are lines of code that are stored on a blockchain and automatically execute when predetermined terms and conditions are met. At the most basic level, they are programs that run as they’ve been set up to run by the people who developed them. The benefits of smart contracts are most apparent in business collaborations, in which they are typically used to enforce some type of agreement so that all participants can be certain of the outcome without an intermediary’s involvement.

The easiest way to explain what a smart contract does is through an example. If you’ve ever bought a car at a dealership, you know there are several steps and it can be a frustrating process. If can’t pay for the car outright, you’ll have to obtain financing. This will require a credit check and you’ll have to fill out several forms with your personal information to verify your identity. Along the way, you’ll have to interact with several different people, including the salesperson, finance broker and lender. To compensate their work, various commissions and fees are added to the base price of the car.

What smart contracts on blockchain can do is streamline this complex process that involves several intermediaries because of a lack of trust among participants in the transaction. With your identity stored on a blockchain, lenders can quickly make a decision about credit. Then, a smart contract would be created between your bank, the dealer and the lender so that once the funds have been released to the dealer, the lender will hold the car’s title and repayment will be initiated based on the agreed terms. The transfer of ownership would be automatic as the transaction gets recorded to a blockchain, is shared among the participants and can be checked at any time.

  • Robust Blockchain datacenter Smart contracts work by following simple “if/when…then…” statements that are written into code on a blockchain. A network of computers executes the actions (releasing funds to the appropriate parties; registering a vehicle; sending notifications; issuing a ticket) when predetermined conditions have been met and verified. The blockchain is then updated when the transaction is completed.
  • Standardized Methodology clarifies content, format, and delivery of products via established, predictable cross-organizational processes.
  • Integrated Communication Strategy generates professional, consistent, high-quality deliverables, concise and precise messages, visual impact across the organization, and increased audience understanding.
  • Attention to Feedback Within a smart contract, there can be as many stipulations as needed to satisfy the participants that the task will be completed satisfactorily. To establish the terms, participants to a blockchain platform must determine how transactions and their data are represented, agree on the rules that govern those transactions, explore all possible exceptions, and define a framework for resolving disputes. It’s usually an iterative process that involves both developers and business stakeholders.

Organizations can develop many different of strategies, processes and technologies, but ultimately the business – and the crux of success – is its people. Blockchain will help an organization from the technical and organizational issues that shape HR structure and strategy to C-suite initiatives that maximize overall organizational effectiveness.

In order to destroy or corrupt a blockchain, a hacker would have to destroy the data stored on every user’s computer in the global network. This could be millions of computers, with each one storing a copy of some or all the data. Unless the hacker could simultaneously bring down an entire network (which is near impossible), undamaged computers, also known as “nodes”, would continue running to verify and keep record of all the data on the network. The impossibility of a task like taking down a whole chain increases along with the amount of users on a network. Bigger blockchain networks with more users have an infinitely lower risk of getting attacked by hackers because of the complexity required to penetrate such a network.

Technology is central to meeting the demands of the newly insured patients and an aging population. Blockchain can guide agencies with a technology-led strategy that includes GTDs, PKJ, analytics, remote patient monitoring, mobility, social media, emerging and predictive care management, and privacy/security.

Blockchain technology has been the new kid on the “block” for some time now and is especially hot when enabling new currencies with the rollercoaster rides that these have recently taken. However, blockchains are not limited to crypto-currencies but are widely being adopted by other industries as well, especially the automotive industry

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